Concert Going with Disabilities

Alan Rasof Concert Going with DisabilitiesFor lots of excited fans, summertime means music festivals and concerts with their favorite artists. This usually entails a good amount of wandering about a venue for food, singing along with the best songs, and more. Individuals with disabilities, believe it or not, also enjoy going to shows and concerts, but often their experience is a little different from attendees who are able-bodied.

Depending on the mobility of the individual, physically getting to the location and finding a seat can be a challenge in and of itself. Often, concert goers who use a wheelchair or power chair to navigate have to jump through lots of hoops to ensure that their seats are wheelchair accessible. Few if any ticket sale websites can “check” to ensure that the person purchasing a wheelchair accessible seat actually needs the accessibility.

Additionally, ticket sales websites like TicketFly and Ticketmaster may not communicate with the actual concert venue with any frequency, so for people in need of accessible seating, finding the right person can be a nightmare. One unfortunate soul spent a month being bounced from the ticket sales company to the venue and back and forth again before finally procuring accessible seating her her and her boyfriend with cerebral palsy.

Other disabilities can impact the concert going experience, too. Recently, one woman’s video went viral on social media after a concert goer recorded her translating an entire Snoop Dogg concert into sign language in front of a large crowd of fans. Those who are hard of hearing or live with significant hearing loss still enjoy the experience of attending concerts and seeing their favorite performers live among others who admire the artist. However, for them to fully enjoy the experience, some need friends or professionals to translate the performance into sign language for them to understand.

Holly Maniatty has been signing rap shows and festivals for sixteen years and has translated the work of such artists as Jay-Z, Eminem, and the Wu Tang Clan. Professionally, Maniatty is an independent contractor hired by the disability department of a festival or concert. To prepare, Maniatty and her team spend weeks studying the lyrics and meter of the songs so that they can sign not only the literal translations to the dense lyrics, but also provide the appropriate body language to accompany them.

People with disabilities have favorite artists just like able-bodied people and enjoy being in the company of others who enjoy the performers. Although their experience is a little different, they love the rush of the crowd and the acceptance they find in music.

from Alan Rasof, Raising Awareness http://ift.tt/2rhDVjO

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Cerebral Palsy at Prom

Alan Rasof CP PromsIt’s prom season for high schools across the United States. Pictures of teens in elegant ball gowns and expensive tuxedos posing with flowers and limousines are flooding news websites and social media streams. Sprinkled among the smiles and sequins, though, is the occasional story about the selfless teens who benevolently decided to take a student with a disability as their prom date.

It’s been a long time since I’ve had to worry about prom, but my grandson Elijah is a toddler now and prom is still in his future. As glad as I am to see so many able-bodied teens taking teens with disabilities to prom, I don’t want this to be newsworthy. Teens with disabilities aren’t novelties, and befriending one shouldn’t be novel and newsworthy.

People with disabilities don’t exist for the rest of us to feel inspired. In a poignant TED talk, Stella Young, a journalist who uses a power chair for mobility, told the audience that she doesn’t need anyone’s help or sympathy, and she certainly doesn’t want to be held up as a model citizen for able-bodied people to think to themselves, “wow, if she can do what she does, so can I.”

Students with Cerebral Palsy especially don’t want to be looked on pitifully or as pets. Many are active members of their communities, participating in events and making friends as their conditions allow. Several people with CP have taken to blogging and vlogging to normalize and humanize their disabilities but also illuminate how difficult it is to navigate a world designed for able-bodied individuals.
As Elijah grows up, I don’t want one of his classmates to take him to prom out of pity or as a grand gesture of selflessness and altruism. Elijah has a wonderful personality. He loves to play and laugh and interact with people. When he grows up, I want someone to take him to prom because they’re friends, not because it’s a kind gesture. I’m sure he’ll be giddy to pick out flowers and bowties, and I can already picture his face lighting up when the DJ plays his favorite song. I don’t ever want to see him as a prop or the object of charity, especially at his prom.

from Alan Rasof, Raising Awareness http://ift.tt/2qCnkWk